We welcome volunteers that would like to gain some experience in research by helping out on projects we are running. Here we post information about those projects and who to contact to get involved. 

We hope to provide our volunteers:

  • Experience in how science gets done, be it study design, data collection, data analysis and/or writing articles.
  • A fun working environment
  • Opportunities to network with other people interested in science
  • The chance to develop fieldwork and/or lab work skills depending on the project

We expect that our volunteers:

  • Have a cheerful, friendly disposition
  • Are committed and reliable
  • Are communicative
  • Attend our regular lab meetings
  • Have up to date first aid training (not essential)
  • Have a valid driver's license & own car (not essential)
  • Basic to advanced level of physical fitness (depending on the work)
  • Are willing to undergo training for some tasks
  • Are willing to fill out paperwork

Volunteer work with mountain katydids

Lucky you! You have found the mountain katydid call for volunteers! We currently have a variety of opportunities to help out on mountain katydid projects, some lab based, some field based. We have videos and videos of data to analyse and papers to write up, mountain katydids to be collected for conservation genomics studies and mechanical RoboDIDs to build. Pack your suitcase and join us on this voyage into the unknown world of deimatism.

For more info on getting involved in mountain katydid research, contact Kate: k.umbers@westernsydney.edu.au


Volunteer field work with bandy bandy snakes

Dr Janne Valkonen, a postdoc from the Centre of Excellence in Biological Interactions at the University of Jyväskylä, Finland, will be visiting the lab in the summer of 2017 to conduct a field project on the colour patterning and motion-dazzle in bandy bandy snakes. Janne will be measuring escape speed and bandwidth (bandy bandy bandwidth!) in snakes up and down the Australian east coast. To volunteer with Janne you should enjoy road cruising (driving slowing along roads at night looking for snakes), staying up late, and McGyvering experimental field gear.

For more info on Janne and how to get in contact go here: https://www.jyu.fi/bioenv/en/divisions/eko/personnel/cards/Valkonen and email Janne here: janne.k.valkonen@jyu.fi


Volunteer field work with emus

Julia Ryeland is conducting her PhD research on captive and wild populations of emus in the Sydney area and in the outback. Julia is enrolled at the Hawkesbury Institute for the Environment at Western Sydney University, and is a member of the Wild Lab, co-supervised by Ricky Spencer. Julia's emu work occurs most of the year. To volunteer with Julia you should enjoy being outdoors, animal behaviour, and observing giant dinosaur-birds. Having your drivers licence and your own car will make it easier for you to be involved than if you don't, but these things are not compulsory requirements. You will need to have current first aid training.

For more information on her research visit Julia's website http://juliaryeland.weebly.com/ and get in contact by sending her an email: J.Ryeland@westernsydney.edu.au


Volunteer field work collecting grasshoppers

Sonu Yadav is conducting her PhD research on genomics, gene expression, physiology and thermal behaviour of Kosciuscola grasshoppers and their friends from the genus Phaulacridium. Sonu will be visiting all kinds of cool places to grab 'hoppers. Sonu is enrolled at Macquarie University and is a member of the Landscape and Evolutionary Genomics Lab, supervised there by Rachael Dudaniec. Your drivers licence and your own car will make it easier for you to be involved than if you don't, but these things are not compulsory requirements. You will need to have current first aid training. You will need to be wiling and able to hike moderate trails and spend single days, multiple days or even weeks in the field. 

For more information on how to volunteer on this project get in contact with Sonu by email: sonu.yadav@students.mq.edu.au


Volunteer field work with red-crowned toadlets

During the late summer and early Autumn we will be looking for people to go frogging to help collect genetic samples for a population genomics study. This field work will require late nights, getting muddy, and driving to field sites. Having first aid training, your drivers licence and your own car will make it easier for you to be involved than if you don't, but these things are not compulsory requirements. You will have to be trained in handing frogs and you will have to be officially named on the ethics documentation and permits. 

For more info on this project, see the descriptions on this website and for advise on how to get involved, contact
Griffin Taylor-Dalton: 18376135@student.uws.edu.au 


Volunteer field work with RoboBluey the blue-tongue lizard robot

During late summer we will be looking for people to help with running experiments that aim to test whether the blue tongue lizard's defensive display helps protect them from predators. The robot is currently being built and we are hoping it will be finished by the end of 2016. This project is a collaboration with Martin Whiting, leader of the Lizard Lab at Macquarie University. Field work will involve visiting bushland around Sydney. Having first aid training, your drivers licence and your own car will make it easier for you to be involved than if you don't, but these things are not compulsory requirements. To volunteer on this project you will have to be officially named on the ethics documentation and permits. 

For more information on how to volunteer on this project get in contact with
Sergio Naretto: narettosergio@gmail.com or Martin Whiting: martin.whiting@mq.edu.au